Thursday, November 19, 2009

Bishop Trautman's Last Stand For Us Idiot Laity

While we were happy to see Bishop Trautman speak out against the Obama/ND what-not, he doesn't get a free pass for his attempts to tamper with and dumb down the liturgy just because he thinks the faithful are idiots.

Per CNA, he's crossed swords with Cardinal George (again) on this same type stuff.

On Tuesday, a motion from Bishop Donald Trautman of Erie, Penn. to reject liturgical translations proposed by the Vatican failed to garner sufficient votes from the U.S. bishops. The prelates went on to approve the new liturgical texts which will be implemented in the U.S. beginning in 2010.

Bishop Trautman, who has headed the bishops' liturgy committee in the past and is a strong supporter of gender-neutral translations, tried to stop the vote on the new liturgical texts by arguing that handing the translation of antiphons for the Psalms to the Congregation for Divine Worship at the Vatican was in violation of Church laws.

Is this really worth it? All in the name of the amorphous "John and Mary Moron Catholic." Antiphons?

He then suggested that Cardinal George was breaking Church laws by giving authorization to the Vatican to handle the antiphons which only a small portion of the liturgical translations being reviewed. He then proposed that the bishops insist on being given a final draft from the international translation committee in order that they be able to review it, suggest improvements, and vote on it.

Cardinal Francis George of Chicago, President of the USCCB, explained that permission was given to Vatican officials after other English-speaking nations had complained that the U.S. bishops were taking too long to approve the translation.

As Bishop Trautman continued to insist, Cardinal George responded, "I feel as if we're doing guerilla warfare here."

"Maybe the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops could sue the Congregation [for Divine Worship] in the Apostolic Signatura," said Cardinal George, drawing laughter from the audience.

It is highly unlikely for an episcopate to sue a dicastery over such an issue, though it is technically possible.


So now Bishop Trautman has exposed himself to public ridicule. I'm not going to get into the nitpicks of his argument, but my recollection of SC is that translations are under the jurisdiction of the episcopal conferences but only subject to the approval of the Holy See. If that's correct, then I don't really see His Excellency's point. My main curiosity here is why he's fighting this so hard, especially given the fact that (a) he's off his rocker in his logic for these defective translations, (b) he's flirting with heresy in some cases, and (c) he's losing. Huge.

Bishop Trautman's proposal was submitted to vote, with the majority of bishops supporting Cardinal George's decision to accept the Vatican translation 194-20.

The final five groups of prayers passed each with support from at least 88 percent of the bishops.

Is this supposed to affect the Eastern churches at all? I'm not sure.

5 comments:

Mark of the Vineyard said...

Perhaps you might clarify something for me. Encyclicals are addressed to the whole Church, correct? Not that I've read many, but of the few I've happened to read, they seem mostly to address the Roman Church. Is this just my impression?

Throwback said...

It all depends. You can see who they are addressed to at the beginning of each one. For example:

Pacem in Terris by John XXIII:

To Our Venerable Brethren the Patriarchs, Primates, Archbishops, Bishops, and all other Local Ordinaries who are at Peace and in Communion with the Apostolic See, and to the Clergy and Faithful of the entire Catholic World, and to all Men of Good Will.


Casti Connubii from Pius XI:

TO THE VENERABLE BRETHREN, PATRIARCHS, PRIMATES, ARCHBISHOPS, BISHOPS, AND OTHER LOCAL ORDINARIES
ENJOYING PEACE AND COMMUNION WITH THE APOSTOLIC SEE.

As you can see, the former was to a lot more folks than just those mentioned in the latter, expecially given that whole "men of good will" part.

The more standard language of Pius XI is clearly addressed to the universal Church, since the Eastern churches in question would be those in communion with Rome.

Some are addressed to the universal Church but with a special target audience in mind, such as Mit Brennder Sorge by Pius XI:

TO THE VENERABLE BRETHREN
THE ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS OF GERMANY AND OTHER ORDINARIES
IN PEACE AND COMMUNION WITH THE APOSTOLIC SEE.

And some are to just one group, such as Longiqua, by Leo XIII:

To the Archbishops and Bishops of the United States.



It just depends on the topic.

Mark of the Vineyard said...

Thanks for the clarificatoin.

Karl said...

Liturgical pronouncements are generally _not_ addressed to us. I would like Liturgiam Authenticam to be applied to our own situation, for example, but it appears not to apply. Alas.

Turgonian said...

Is he one of the ones who changed the text of the very Magnificat? You know, so that it says "as he promised Abraham and Sarah" rather than just "as he promised Abraham"?